Prof Lesley will talk on why trams are likely the solution to Bath’s traffic problems:

Cost of service diversion do not rule out trams, Edinburgh notwithstanding

  Dear all,                 My expertise in this is that as part of the design and costing work for the proposed Greenwich Waterfront Transit (GWT)project (tram technology option) I did a desk top cost evaluation of the costs of utilities relocations in Woolwich. It was agreed that for that project utilities costs would be significant […]

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How many rail, bus and car journeys and passenger miles are there?

On Thu, 17 May 2018, 1:20 p.m. Dick Daniel, <richard@daniel28.co.uk> wrote: They say ‘Today, only 5% of journeys are made by bus, with 10% by rail, 1% by air, 1% by bicycle and 83% by car or taxi.’ I’ve always understood far more PT journeys are by bus than rail, so I’m not sure of these figures. […]

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EDINBURGH TRAM INQUIRY REPORT ON RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TRAMWAYS AND UTILITIES’ APPARATUS

EDINBURGH TRAM INQUIRY REPORT ON RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TRAMWAYS AND UTILITIES’ APPARATUS David John Rumney. Academic and professional qualifications: BSc Hons Engineering Science, Durham University CEng Chartered Engineer MICE (Retired) Member of the Institution of Civil Engineers MIHT (Retired) Member of the Institution of Highways and Transportation MCIArb (Retired) Member of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators […]

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Paris, faced with the chronic congestion caused by the automobile re-introduced trams in the 1970s

Wikipedia:  https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tramway_d%27%C3%8Ele-de-France The Île-de-France contemporary tramway is made up of ten distinct lines, each with a different history and different materials. Seven have been created from scratch on urban roads, and three are the result of the modernization of formerly under-exploited railway lines. In addition to the metro and the bus network , Paris and its region have owned a major tramway network that operated between 1855 and 1938 in Paris and until 1957 in Versailles . Faced with the […]

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who benefits from trams and who should pay

The word subsidy distorts the debate, and makes it far more political than it needs to be. Successful systems arise when all the beneficiaries of the system pay its costs, and there are many beneficiaries who, in this country, do not pay. My list of beneficiaries from a tram system includes: The passengers, and, in […]

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The majority of London’s traffic emission not from vehicle exhausts

“…about 88 per cent of London’s road traffic emission now arises from vehicle brake and tyre wear and resuspension…” Transport for London Report 10 http://content.tfl.gov.uk/travel-in-london-report-10.pdf … see the bottom of page 12, and figure 6.22 and the following text on page 163: “Although London now complies with limit values for PM10, continued reductions to ambient concentrations […]

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Trams really do run every 6 – 8 minutes throughout the day

West Midlands by tram Bigger, better – and more frequent Your Midland Metro runs from Wolverhampton to Birmingham, so it’s perfect for getting to Bilston, Wednesbury, West Bromwich, The Hawthorns and the Jewellery Quarter. Trams run every 6-8 minutes during the day and every 15 minutes on evenings and Sundays. National Express Midland Metro operates the tram […]

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