Saturday 8th February 2020 – Bath Area Trams Association national conference and get together

REGISTER FOR CONFERENCE HERE:   https://www.eventbrite.com/e/bath-area-trams-conference-and-get-together-tickets-83359575735

FREE LUNCH INCLUDED £5 – £15 

BRLSI Bath Literary and Scientific Institution, Queens Square, Bath, 9.00 coffee and registration for 10.00 start. Saturday 8th February 2020

PRESS RELEASE

FRENCH ENGINEERING GIANT TO TALK AT BATH AREA TRAMS ASSOCIATION NATIONAL CONFERENCE AND GET TOGETHER Saturday Feb 8th.

EGIS who have reinstalled many of the 27 new French tramways ( all removed after the war), specifically and successfully to to reduce traffic and revitalise the towns,  and the current extension to the Birmingham tramway ( including hill sections in sensitive areas without overhead wires) will discuss the feasibility and likely costs of re-installing them in Bath and the environs.

Other expert speakers will give their views also.

BRLSI Bath Literary and Scientific Institution, Queens Square, Bath, 9.00 coffee and registration for 10.00 start. Saturday 8th February 2020

Looking at the case for trams, why, where and how they could be deployed and the next steps.

The hard evidence is that trams for Bath ( and Radstock Midsomer Norton, Chippenham, Keynsham, Bristol), integrated with buses, can be a solution to the traffic congestion and associated pollution issues in the city and nearby settlements. Trams can be a stimulus to the area’s economy by facilitating movement into and within the city. This will benefit those who live and work here as well as the many commuters, visitors and shoppers who come to work in, or enjoy all this world heritage city has to offer. The clear evidence from other cities worldwide is that buses alone will not achieve these benefits because fundamental differences mean buses cannot offer a service that is sufficiently attractive and acceptable to car drivers, who are the cause of congestion for them to leave their car at home voluntarily.

EGIS who have reinstalled many of the 27 trams removed after the war in France will apply their experience to the possibility of re-installing trams into Bath. EGIS are currently taking a leading role in extending the Birmingham tram system, including hilly and heritage sections with no overhead wires which has been a concern to some Bathonians. Other experts and politicians will give their views.

In addition to a comprehensive network within Bath itself, tram or light rail connections to Chippenham, Radstock, Bristol and Bristol airport (integrated with buses) are also being considered as they all generate considerable traffic into Bath. Experts from the transport sector and particularly from those 8 UK towns who have reinstalled or who are re-installing trams (Edinburgh, Nottingham, Birmingham, and Preston) will be giving their views, along with local leaders of the political parties. (Note: none of the politician speakers necessarily endorse Bath Trams’ position)

https://www.egis-group.com/

ENDS

Website: https://www.bathtrams.uk/

Register for conference here:  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/bath-area-trams-conference-and-get-together-tickets-83359575735

(also Register for optional Friday night pre-conference get together and meal here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/friday-evening-february-7th-2020-730-pm-informal-get-together-food-tickets-85412000593)

This flyer is constantly evolving – check here for latest version: https://bathtrams.uk/saturday-8th-february-2020-bath-area-trams-association-national-conference-and-get-together/

Provisional – timings and speakers not finalised 

0900 Coffee and registration, biscuits

1000 Opening Remarks –– Wera Hobhouse MP

1010 Keynote presentation – Christian Wolmar well known author on transport issues “Are trams socialist?”

1020 TBA Neil Butters, Lib Dem B&NES lead for transport will talk on the history of trams in Bath, and the B&NES and WECA approaches to transport in the area.

1040 EGIS – Giles Atkinson. The large French engineering group EGIS has engineered the re-installation of many of the 27 French tram systems that have been re-installed since the war.  They will give their views on the costs and feasibility of re-installing tram in Bath based on their experience of similar sized towns. Giles.ATKINSON-int@egis.fr Illy.TOIBER@egis.fr  Maria-Teresa.MOLINA@egis.fr Marion.RIVOIRE@egis.fr

1120 Coffee

1140  David Walmsley BSc, PhD, CMILT, MCIHT, UKTram; walmsleydtransport@gmail.com European Urban Tram Forum, formerly Fixed Track Executive at Confederation of Passenger Transport. Tram technical lead.

A presentation on tramway safety, based around the European COST safety project on “Operation and safety of tramways in interaction with urban space.” The project brought together operators, transport authorities, government agencies and academics from across Europe to share knowledge and experience. DW was one of the two UK reps.

Obviously, trams are pretty safe, but it is important to design for safety and learn from experience. Indeed, it is because tramway designers do this that trams are one of the safest means of transport.

DW would envisage presenting the “hot spots” analysis to identify locations where accidents could occur, such as junctions and tramstops. The project report contains dozens of examples of how hazards are identified and solutions developed based on experience and best practice from across Europe. I would present a few examples.

 

Key points: Modern trams are an important part of public transport provision in countries all over Europe (especially France with 28 new systems); trams are accessible for people with disabilities; trams are very safe; trams are good for urban development and regeneration. There are tram systems in cities of similar or smaller size than Bath.

1200 Andrew Braddock, will deliver a shortened talk originally from Roger Harrison ( rogersharrison@yahoo.co.uk Chair Tramlink Nottingham the successful Nottingham tram system 2007-2015. and President LRTA ( Light Rail Transit Association) 2015-2017)  Hi-lighting:

Modal shift to trams from cars

Low carbon

Attraction to business

Parking levy

Highly successful

 

Timing error needs correcting in due course

 

1200 Panel Discussion – Local politicians and Business view

  • Neil Butters Lib Dems
  • Chris Watt Conservatives
  • Labour partly – TBA
  • Dominic Tristram – Green party
  • Robin Kerr, FOBRA
  • Van du Bose?

1210 Questions from the audience

1245 Lunch

1330 Tim Kendell BSc CEng MICE MAPM FPWI – Member UKTram – Technical Director LRTA/TramForward.  tim.kendell@lrta.org

Transport and Works Act 1992 Order – Why it is required to authorise a new tramway, particularly in a World Heritage City.

Tim’s talk will cover the background around the TWA Order and why it was introduced. He will describe the benefits it and only it can give a new Tramway and the process from Route Planning, Consultation, Major Order Documents, Objectors, the Public Inquiry and the granting of an Order. Tim was highly involved in the Thameslink 2000 Project (draft Act) and the East London Line Southern extension TWA Order. Whilst these are metro type projects, the process is the same, although there are specific standard clause for tramways that are different to Heavy Rail Standard Clause.

1350 Professor Lewis Lesley – BSc, AKC, PhD, CEng, FRSA, MICE, FCIT, MTPS) ljslesley@aol.com. Professor Lesley has spent the bulk of his academic career studying how to get people to use buses rather than cars, and found that nowhere has this been successful. On the other hand he will give evidence of where trams systems have successfully drawn people out of their cars and in so doing reduced congestion and pollution. He is the developer of the privately funded Preston Tram using a novel tram and track system which is privately funded.

Key points: nowhere have buses solved a city congestion problem. Busses are good for rural and tram feeders. Trams can run every 6 minutes and carry 4-5 the traffic volume  of a bus. Traffic lights can be scheduled centrally to prevent traffic blocking without route segregation, but this cannot be done for buses. Even bus priority lanes does not encourage people out of cars in high numbers.

1410  Cllr Robert Aldridge will talk on the Edinburgh tramway with which he was closely involved. dobstar@blueyonder.co.uk

1430 Dr Nick Mallinson – Programme Manager at Warwick Manufacturing Group (WMG) – WMG is leading a consortium that is developing a lower cost tram solution on behalf of Coventry City Council and Transport for West Midlands – the system is based on very light rail technology with the aim of achieving a system cost of £10m per kilometre Nick.Mallinson@warwick.ac.uk. .

1450 Tony Young MSc CEng FICE FCILT MIHT (Tony’s talk will be given by Andrew Braddock) Key points tyc@clara.co.uk Tony’s talk will explain that tram systems can be viable in smaller towns (like Bath) as well as in big cities based on a case study which compares York, UK to Freiburg in Germany. The two towns are very similar in size, socio-economic data, population, wealth etc . and both have large universities. tyc@clara.co.uk

After twenty three years with Greater Manchester Passenger Transport Executive, Tony Young became an independent transportation engineering consultant, specializing in light rail. He was involved in the very successful Manchester Metrolink from its inception in the early eighties to its completion and operation in 1992, leading the planning team that evaluated the options and progressed the chosen street running light rail system. He has provided consultancy assistance on light rail proposals for a number of authorities in the UK (including Bath), Ireland, Italy, Greece, Portugal, Israel, USA and Canada. He is a Churchill Fellow and an Honorary Life Member of the Light Rail Transit Association

Tony’s talk will explain that tram systems can be viable in smaller towns as well as in big cities based on a case study which compares York, UK to Freiburg in Germany. The two towns are very similar in size, socio-economic data, population, wealth etc . and both have large universities. The big difference is their transport strategies. As you know Freiburg has the highest per capita use of trams of any city in the world and York has no trams.

His data compares all trips mode shares. Not only does Freiburg have a higher mode share for tram use it also has significantly higher mode shares from cycling and walking (because of bi-modal trips such as walk-tram walk and cycle-tram-walk). Also car use in Freiburg is impressively low even though car ownership is very similar to York; and there are no policies of aggressive anti car taxes or control of car use. It is argued then that in Bath we do not need any new penalties, fines, taxes, charges, controls, etc on motorists as they will voluntarily switch to trams but not buses. Note: Tony’s talk will be given by Andrew Braddock. ajb@uktram.org.uk

1510 Coffee

1530  Panel Discussion with Technical Experts

  • Cllr Robert Aldridge dobstar@blueyonder.co.uk experience of the Edinburgh tramway
  • David Rumney – drumney@clara.co.uk utilities and tram planning – utilities do not generally need to be diverted
  • David Walmsley BSc, PhD, CMILT, MCIHT, UKTram – a couple minutes on Manchester at as per the earlier draft. walmsleydlrta@gmail.com
  • Andrew Braddock – trams for small cities ajb@uktram.org.uk
  • James J Harkins Light Rail (UK) FCILT, MTPS Applrguk@aol.com
  • Bob Chard – ULR CONSENTS AND APPROVALS ; EXPERT ADVISER TO OVER 20 PROMOTIONS TEAMS ; SOME BUILT SOME FAILED; range £25m to £16bn.. bobchard@islebarton.eclipse.co.uk

Questions

1600– Overview and next steps. Dave Andrews, Chair, Bath Trams

1615 – Conference Ends

Bath Trams Conference

Saturday, 8th February 2020

09:00Registration- Coffee & Biscuits
09:50Admin Points – Chairman Bath Area Trams Dave Andrews
10:00Opening Remarks – Wera Hobhouse MP
10:10Keynote Presentation: Are Trams Socialist? 

Christian Wolmar

10:20EGIS: Costs/Feasibility of Reinstalling trams in Bath

Giles Atkinson, Illy Toiber, Maria-Teresa Molina, Marion Rivoire (EGIS)

11:00Buses, Cars and Trams

Professor Lewis Lesley – BSc, AKC, PhD, CEng, FRSA, MICE, FCIT, MTPS)

11:20Coffee
11:40Tramway Safety.  Based around the European COST safety project: “Operation and safety of tramways in interaction with urban space.”

David Walmsley BSc, PhD, CMILT, MCIHT, UKTram

12:00The Case for Trams-Andrew Braddock
12:20Panel Discussion with Technical Experts

Andrew Braddock, Bob Chard, James J Harkins, Christopher Maltin, David Rumney, David Walmsley

12:30Questions from the Audience
12:50Lunch
13:30Transport and Works Act 1992 Order – Why it is required to authorize a new tramway, particularly in a World Heritage City.

Tim Kendell BSc CEng MICE MAPM FPWI – Member UKTram – Technical Director LRTA/TramForward.

13:50Lower Cost Tram Solution

Dr Nick Mallinson – Programme Manager at Warwick Manufacturing Group (WMG)

14:10Lessons from Edinburgh Tram

Cllr Robert Aldridge

14:30History of trams in Bath, B&NES and WECA approaches to transport in the area.

Neil Buttlers, Lib Dem B&NES lead for transport

14:50Panel Discussion – Local politicians and Business view

Neil Butters (Lib Dems), Chris Watt (Conservatives), Labour party (tbd), Dominic Tristram (Green party), FOBRA – awaiting response, Van du Bose?

15:30Summary and next steps- Chairman Bath Area Trams Dave Andrews
16:00Conference Ends

 

Why Trams Work (But Integrated With Buses) Whereas Buses Alone Don’t, In Tackling Pollution Congestion, Climate Emergency

 

  • Nowhere have buses achieved a significant modal shift from cars to buses because for the reasons below, they cannot offer the same high quality and prestigious service which a tram can.
  • Trams typical get a 30 – 40 % modal shift due to fundamental engineering differences which translate into a more economic and attractive vehicle:

https://bathtrams.uk/evidence-that-car-drivers-will-switch-to-trams-but-not-buses-1/

  • In trams passengers not cramped in bench seats. Passengers not stuck next to a potentially bad actors ( important for school children and young women for example) due to non-bench seats and walk through vehicles.
  • Trams are smoother and quieter than a bus due to the rails, whereas a bus has to deal with defects in the road and on a dedicate busway soon creates ruts and grooves.
  • Trams have a much higher capacity than buses

https://bathtrams.uk/relative-carrying-capacity-cars-buses-trams/

  • Lower overall cost – more passengers per driver, lower running cost per passenger, financed at 1 % over 40 yrs lower capex. Buses have higher running cost.

https://bathtrams.uk/solving-baths-traffic/comparative-benefits-trams-vs-buses/

  • The above means that trams can operate at much more rapid frequency around the clock – 2 minutes in Budapest, 6 minutes in UK. Buses can’t do this because they have to accumulate enough passengers at bus stops with long service gaps.
  • Trams are much more reliable, and coupled with high frequency eliminate the 1/3 extra morning peak journeys to school by permitting even two tram journeys to be feasible.
  • Tram can climb all the hills in Bath and the road to Radstock without resort to rack or cables.
  • Any fixed rail link increases property values, and commercial activity.
  • Any fixed rail link which starts out rural soon attracts development alongside ( eg Metropolitan line – numerous examples.)
  • Numerous examples of bus schemes that have not been successful in UK eg Swansea £10m failure https://bathtrams.uk/difficulties-and-problems-encountered-with-bus-rapid-transit-in-the-uk/

https://bathtrams.uk/buses-and-busways-some-factual-observations-by-prof-lewis-lesley/